Images

Rally for Justice in Iberá: FRIDAY 2pm @ WIDENER

Rally to Stop Harvard’s Argentine Mismanagement and Exploitation

Harvard needs to hear the message from us LOUD AND CLEAR: END the abuses. We are ONE Harvard community, and we deserve ONE set of standards. 

Will you join us to on April 11th as we unite across the 4000 miles between Corrientes and Harvard Yard to demand an end to the injustice? 

HARVARD INJUSTICES IN IBERÁ: 
For 7 years, Harvard-owned plantations in the Argentine Iberá Wetlands have jeopardized Emilio and Adrian’s communities and their way of life, squeezing out profits in the name of Harvard students’ benefit.

RALLYING FOR JUSTICE:
Join the Responsible Investment at Harvard Coalition for an epic RALLY on FRIDAY, APRIL 11th at 2PM to honor Emilio and Adrian’s visit to Cambridge and hear their account firsthand.

CO SPONSORS:
Responsible Investment at Harvard Coalition
Students for a Just and Stable Future
Food and Water Watch
Student Labor Action Movement
Harvard Developers for Development
Harvard College Progressive Jewish Alliance
Harvard College Palestine Solidarity Committee
Responsible Endowments Coalition
Harvard Kennedy School Progressive Caucus
Harvard College Environmental Action Committee
HealthRoots at Harvard School of Public Health

This rally is part of the Stop Harvard’s Argentinian Mismanagement and Exploitation (SHAME) Tour week-of-action from April 5 to 16th.

Advertisements

Dec 5 Letter from Communities in Argentina to President Faust

Scroll down to see a translated version of this letter.Dec 5 Letter, Spanish, Page 1

09-120002 (1)

English Version:

Corrientes Capital, December 5, 2013

Dear Harvard University President Drew Faust:

We write to you on behalf of the communities affected by your plantations in the Department of San Miguel.

We want to point out that it has been almost two months since the Oakland Institute and the Responsible Investment at Harvard Coalition released a report documenting the impacts that your companies generate in our communities.

At that same time, a group of students who are in solidarity with our struggle delivered to you a letter with three main points:

  • The request to stop expanding your plantations until you have completed an environmental and social impact study. This study should be cumulative, cooperative and inclusive of damages that have already been generated.

  • That timber plantations be moved immediately to a minimum distance of 2000 meters from our communities.

  • That you comply with all legally required employment practices for your workers in Corrientes.

But instead of siting down to discuss our demands and find a solution to this conflict, your companies have resorted to intimidation and scare tactics.

Mrs. Drew Faust, we have no idea how you resolve conflicts in the United States. But here, we don’t want your managers to seek us out, one by one, and pressure us in an attempt to make us abandon our struggle. We will not accept the recurrence of mysterious situations, such as being followed on the streets and seeing your company’s vehicles crash into our neighbor’s trucks.

What we want is for you to start an open dialogue with everyone who signed the letter you received almost two months ago.

We are only workers, farmers, citizens, students, and common folk, but we do not eat wood. We are not fools. Your people have met with the the Provincial Government to determine how to deal with this conflict, and there are pictures out in the open to prove it.

If there is no dialogue about how to implement our requests, we will make you personally responsible for any situation where our lands are involved and our physical or moral integrity is in jeopardy. You have been made aware of our situation. It depends on you to bring forth dialogue and disarm the conflict. We are a peaceful people, but we will not be stepped on.

We hope to hear back from you soon.

Residents of the Department of San Miguel, Corrientes Province of Argentina